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Nosebleed faq's
Q: What causes nosebleeds?
Q: How are nosebleeds stopped?
Q: How do I avoid rebleeding?
Q: Are there different types of nosebleeds?
Q: When should I see a physician?
Q: Do children "grow out" of nosebleeds?
 
Q: What causes nosebleeds?
A: Nosebleeds are caused by anything that irritates the delicate lining of the nose. The most common causes are dry air (in dry climates or with heating during the winter seasons), colds and respiratory viruses, nose-picking, forcefully blowing the nose, and anything that causes crusting inside of the nose such as allergies.

An injury to the face can also cause nosebleeds.
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Q: How are nosebleeds stopped?
A: Sit or stand with your head tilted forward (so that the blood does not go into your throat).

Pinch the soft part of your nostrils together just below the nasal bones (the bony portion of the nose). Pinch for 10 to 15 minutes without letting go (don't keep checking to see if the bleeding has stopped).

Some experts suggest applying an ice pack to the area around the nose, but there is no evidence available about whether or not ice is helpful.
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Q: How do I avoid rebleeding?
A: To avoid rebleeding, don't blow your nose for 24 hours. You may also want to avoid lifting heavy objects or straining for 24 hours.   Top
 
Q: Are there different types of nosebleeds?
A: Nosebleeds most often occur (more than 90% of the time) in the front part of the nose ("anterior nosebleeds"). Nosebleeds in children and young adults are almost always anterior. These types of nosebleeds are typically easy to treat.

Nosebleeds that come from the deepest part of the nose are called "posterior nosebleeds". Posterior nosebleeds are very uncommon in children and young adults, and occur most often in older people, people with high blood pressure, and people who have had injuries to the face. Posterior nosebleeds can often be severe and difficult to stop. They typically require emergency treatment by a specialist.

A posterior nosebleed can be suspected if blood flows down the back of the nose and into the throat even while sitting or standing.
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Q: When should I see a physician?
A: Nosebleeds are very common (approximately 10% of people experience a significant nose bleed) and are almost always easy to stop.

Contact a physician if bleeding does not stop after an hour or so, bleeding is unusually heavy, the amount of blood loss is large, you feel weak or light-headed, or if blood flows down the back of the nose and into the throat even while sitting or standing.

Also, discuss the nosebleeds with a physician if there is a family history of a bleeding problem, or if nosebleeds occur frequently.
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Q: Do children "grow out" of nosebleeds?
A: Nosebleeds are more common in young children. Many children "grow out" of this problem and recurring nosebleeds are less common in people over age 14.   Top
 
 
     
NOTE: Just because a drug or combination of drugs can cause a symptom does not mean it is actually causing your symptom. Symptoms can be caused by medical conditions as well. Make sure that your physician is aware of any symptoms you are experiencing so he/she can work with you to determine the cause. Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.
DISCLAIMER: Please note that the information DoubleCheckMD.com provides is intended to help individuals to work with their medical professionals and is for educational purposes only. It does not constitute medical or healthcare advice and serves to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of a healthcare professional. In all cases individuals should consult with a physician before taking any action based on DoubleCheckMD feedback including, but not limited to ceasing taking any drug, changing diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. The information provided by DoubleCheckMD.com is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that the use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective.


 
 
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